Food for thought

food for thought

something that makes you think a lot about a particular subject

something that should be considered carefully

The video below will give you a lot of food for thought.

Case with Everyday Masters made the video with his daughters. Two oversouls have a conversation about going to earth, the craziest experience they have ever had.


“This short story describes what I believe is happening on the planet. The Frequencies mentioned in the video are real, and they are speeding up the awakening of everyone that attunes to them.” Case

His daughters’ speech is clear, so it’s a good listening practice with lots of useful vocabulary. Listen carefully to pronunciation. Look up the words you don’t know. Notice how words are combined and take notes.

So, did the video give you food for thought?

give sb food for thought

to make someone think seriously about something

I’m just a normal guy who spent most of his life searching for answers to the big questions in life.  In my search for “truth”, I started to realize just how powerful we truly are.  I started to understand how we are creating our life and why this knowledge had to be kept from us because if we ever remembered who we were, we could and would change the world in an instant.  Case (full text at https://www.everydaymasters.life/resources/)

https://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/musee/collections/oeuvres/thinker

A Simple, Powerful Prayer in Challenging Times

In this beautiful video, Moojibaba addresses the concerns and fears that many are facing during the current global crisis. Mooji shows us a powerful exercise and prayer which is tremendous support during such trying times — a ‘thank you’ prayer. “I’m going to show you right now a very simple practice to help you to feel calm and integrated again. Of all the mantras, of all the wonderful things you can think about, or say, or feel, saying, Thank you is one of the most effective and great mantras or prayers you can make.”

There are many useful words in his talk, words that we frequently use in our conversations.

Listen carefully and try to write down what you hear. It’s a good listening exercise. He speaks very clearly. And you can always turn on subtitles if you need.

Many of the adjectives he uses (calm, sad, angry, frustrated, lonely, depressed) we have learned already. Do you hear a different one? Which one?

What does he say that means the same as touched, moved?

And what about the nouns which name feelings, like peace, gratitude, depression? Make a list of them. Look them up in a dictionary.

“We hope you will join us in praying for the health and wellbeing of all who have been or will be affected by the virus, wherever they are in the world. May its growth and impact diminish quickly; may the sick recover to newfound strength; may we all use this challenging time to continue growing in ourselves, to discover the power and grace of the eternal light within us.”

~ Moojibaba

To err is human, to correct is divine

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “To err is human; to forgive, divine.”

It was written by the English poet Alexander Pope, in his poem An Essay on Criticism, in 1711, at age 23. A wise young man who remained in ill health throughout his life, read avidly and was able to support himself as a translator and writer.

But, would the “error”, the “mistake” be the problem?

Wouldn’t the problem be in the “judgment” we make on ourselves as well as on others?

According to the National Science Foundation, the average person has around 12,000 to 60,000 thoughts per day. Of those, 80% are apparently negative and 95% of our thoughts are repetitive.

This is also true for our learning process, where “judgment” can do a lot of damage. We all make “mistakes”, as we are all, as human beings, “works in progress”.

What if we were able to stand back (not judge) and see that we are on our journey and that not choosing the best way sometimes, allows us to get to know a better one.

First let’s look at this proverb.

Below is very good listening, vocabulary, and content practice. You will hear a lot of the words and expressions we have been learning (task, figure out, solve, on the flip side, struggle, look at, discussion, looks like, procedure, leftovers, approach, worth it). Watch carefully. Take notes of the words you identify. Turn on subtitles if you need them.

To err is human – and can promote learning | Nikol Rummel shines a new light on failure in her talk and focuses on its productivity for learning. She argues that struggling can help activate relevant prior knowledge and allows us to gain a deeper understanding of a problem, and can thus prepare us for learning more successfully from subsequent instruction. 

Dr. Nikol Rummel says:

“Struggle is not only okay, it is in fact productive for learning”.

A hero lies in you

How many things do you do every day? How many people do you provide for? How hard do you work to earn a living? What are your responsibilities? Are you or someone you love having to cope with a severe disease?

We tend to look up to (to admire or respect) some people, our heroes, as examples and role models. But think carefully. When you spend some time really listening to someone, when you have the money to pay all your bills, when you care for a sick person daily, you are a hero. That’s when a hero lies inside of you.

Look at the lyrics below. Look up the words you don’t know, and notice how they combine. Then play the game. Have fun!

Hero

There’s a hero
If you look inside your heart
You don’t have to be afraid
Of what you are
There’s an answer
If you reach into your soul
And the sorrow that you know
Will melt away

And then a hero comes along
With the strength to carry on
And you cast your fears aside
And you know you can survive
So when you feel like hope is gone
Look inside you and be strong
And you’ll finally see the truth
That a hero lies in you

It’s a long road
When you face the world alone
No one reaches out a hand
For you to hold
You can find love
If you search within yourself
And that emptiness you felt
Will disappear

And then a hero comes along
With the strength to carry on
And you cast your fears aside
And you know you can survive
So when you feel like hope is gone
Look inside you and be strong
And you’ll finally see the truth
That a hero lies in you
That a hero lies in you
Mmm, that a hero lies in you

Lord knows, dreams are hard to follow
But don’t let anyone tear them away
Just hold on, there will be tomorrow
In time, you’ll find the way

And then a hero comes along, with the strength to carry on
And you cast your fears aside, and you know you can survive
So when you feel like hope is gone
Look inside you and be strong
And you’ll finally see the truth, that a hero lies in you

That a hero lies in you
That a hero lies in you
That a hero lies in you

Simple lessons…

Beginning of a new week!

What about a great message of encouragement? That’s the farewell of HEINEKEN CEO Jean-François van Boxmeer.

Listen carefully to it! His pronunciation is so clear! Write down the transcript! Let’s look closely at the words and how they combine together. You can check how many useful words are pronounced and used, like the word: worth.

What are the few simple lessons he shared? What do you think about these tips?

Now, concerning the difficult times we’re going through, what does he say? Does his message put you in low spirits?